Light Blinds, Shadows Show

My name is Kirk. I live in Portland, OR. I shoot things with cameras. I like movies & music & books & science & people & animals.

anikocean asked:

Thank you for answer.. I'm happy that you like our culture) we aren't as popular as other countries in the world and it's nice when someone from another country knows about us and like..:)) I live in Tbilisi.. I adore Sophiko Chiaureli,u know her,I think... Which actors and directors do you like in georgian films? Or which films are ur favourite? Have you ever been in my country?

Sophiko Chiaureli is amazing. The roles she played were so varied and wide-ranging, and she was always perfect in every single one of them. It seems like there was nothing she couldn’t do.

There are many great Georgian actors I’ve seen in one or two films, but the one who really stands out for me is Kakhi Kavsadze. Always so full of energy, he’s the kind of actor who can go “over the top” and make it authentic because his personality in real life is actually that big. Of course he can be very subtle, too.

Otar Iosseliani is one of my very favorite directors, Georgian or otherwise. Tengiz Abuladze is great, too. I love Mikheil Kobakhidze’s films, it’s a shame his body of work is so small. Eldar and Georgy Shengelaya did some wonderful work. Unfortunately due to limited availability I’ve had a hard time building much of a sense of directors’ whole careers. Some directors I think I might really like (Lana Gogoberidze, for example) remain mostly inaccessible to me thus far because I can’t find any of their films with English subtitles and I don’t speak Georgian (or Russian, for that matter). Of course there’s also Mikhail Kalatozov and Georgy Daneliya, both of whom I love, but I tend to think of them more generally as “Soviet” directors, even though each of them made a couple films that were more distinctly Georgian.

Aside from Iosseliani’s films, all of which I adore (esp. There Once Was a Singing Blackbird), I think The Wishing Tree is one of the most beautiful movies I’ve ever seen, and The Plea (Vedreba) is nearly as good. Sun of the Sleepless. Blue Mountains. I think current Georgian cinema is heading in a really exciting direction, too. In Bloom, Street Days, and The Machine Which Makes Everything Disappear are among the very best movies I’ve seen in the last few years.

I’ve never been to Georgia, sadly—in fact, I’m a little ashamed to admit this, but I’ve never been outside of North America (not for lack of interest, but for lack of money).


The Major obstacle for amateur film-makers is their own sense of inferiority vis-a-vis professional productions.The very classification of “amateur” has an apologetic ring. But that very word - from the Latin amator, “lover” - means one who does something for the love of the thing rather for than economic reasons or necessity. And this is the meaning from which the amateur film-maker should take his cue. Instead of envying the script and dialogue writers, the trained actors, the elaborate staffs and sets, the enormous production budgets of the professional film, the amateur should make use of the one great advantage which all professionals envy him, namely, freedom - both artistic and physical.
Maya Deren, “Amateur versus Professional”

The Major obstacle for amateur film-makers is their own sense of inferiority vis-a-vis professional productions.The very classification of “amateur” has an apologetic ring. But that very word - from the Latin amator, “lover” - means one who does something for the love of the thing rather for than economic reasons or necessity. And this is the meaning from which the amateur film-maker should take his cue. Instead of envying the script and dialogue writers, the trained actors, the elaborate staffs and sets, the enormous production budgets of the professional film, the amateur should make use of the one great advantage which all professionals envy him, namely, freedom - both artistic and physical.

Maya Deren, “Amateur versus Professional”

(Source: communicants)

kafkasapartment:

 Solitude, 1956. Paul Delvaux. Oil on panel

kafkasapartment:

 Solitude, 1956. Paul Delvaux. Oil on panel

(via iwanttobelikearollingstone)

cinemaoftheworld:

Tanta Agua (So Much Water, 2013) - dir. Leticia Jorge, Ana Guevara | Uruguay, Mexico

(via andreii-tarkovsky)

"You’ll have to kill me to get rid of me."

Pandora’s Box (1929) dir. G.W. Pabst
DP: Günther Krampf

(Source: hellobooze, via perfectframes)

tritticodelledelizie:

Gian Lorenzo Bernini

Apollo e Daphne

from Ovid’s Metamorphoses

marble, 1622-25, Galleria Borghese, Roma

(via tierradentro)

magictransistor:

Edvard Munch. Woodcuts. Woman’s Head Against the Shore, Melancholy II, Evening Melancholy II, Woman on the Shore II, Encounter in Space, Woman on the Shore I, Two Human Beings The Lonely Ones, Man Bathing, The Girls on the Bridge, Towards the Forest II (top to bottom). 1890s-1920.

(via iwanttobelikearollingstone)

Night Moves, Kelly Reichardt, 2013

(Source: meta-frame)

Night Moves (Kelly Reichardt, USA, 2013)

Night Moves (Kelly Reichardt, USA, 2013)

 Christine Lavin - “Cold Pizza for Breakfast”

anikocean asked:

hi. do you love Georgian cinematography?? :))

Yes, I do! I was turned on to Georgian culture generally by a friend I met several years ago who was born there. One time we stayed up all night watching VHS tapes of Georgian cartoons while she translated for me—those were the first Georgian films I saw. The food and the folk music came next. Georgian cinema in general took a while longer for me to get into just because it’s so hard to find most of it, but it definitely occupies a special place in my heart now. I wish there was more available outside of Georgia. Hopefully the huge retrospectives that begin this month at MoMA and at BAM/PFA will raise its profile a bit.

wandrlust:

Ueno tube station, Tokyo, 1996 — Gueorgui Pinkhassov

ozu-teapot:

Wendy and Lucy - Kelly Reichardt - 2008